Spendthrift Manor and Frugal Homestead


There are two ways of life available in American households today
-- I thought I would compare them from a household perspective:

  • The residents of Spendthrift Manor go to restaurants and order in all the time, whereas the residents of Frugal Homestead enjoy home cooked meals and the occasional special dinner out (When Did Going Out to Dinner . . .).
  • The residents of Spendthrift Manor value the quantity of new material things, whereas the residents of Frugal Homestead value experiences and happy memories that last a lifetime.
  • The residents of Spendthrift Manor have dogs with toys, clothes, and medical care, whereas the residents of Frugal Homestead value productive hobbies and pastimes.
  • The residents of Spendthrift Manor drink bottled "vitamin" water, whereas the residents of Frugal Homestead drink filtered well water.
  • The residents of Spendthrift Manor are quick to throw away and purchase new, whereas the residents of Frugal Homestead fix, repair, or recycle.
  • The residents of Spendthrift Manor wear this year's fashions purchased at full retail prices, whereas the residents of Frugal Homestead wear durable classics purchased on sale.
  • The residents of Spendthrift Manor eat pre-prepared and processed foods, whereas the residents of Frugal Homestead eat fresh from their garden.
  • The residents of Spendthrift Manor are one disaster away from humility because despite appearances-- they spend more than they make, whereas the residents of Frugal Homestead carefully plan, budget, and prepare for life's surprises.

My wife and I know many friends and neighbors that live in Spendthrift Manor-- my kids live in both of these residences . . . Where do you and yours' live?

 

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Trackbacks
  • 7/26/2009 12:29 AM DEFENSIVE-ENTREPRENEURSHIP.COM wrote:
    Added value is the by-product of adding value. When you take raw materials and "process" them, you are adding value and the resultant product has added value. Confused? Let's put it in simple terms: A tree is cut down (processed) by a lumber jack. He will be paid the basic value of the tree and for his added value of processing the tree. A freight company moves the processed log to the lumber mill. They are paid for the added value of getting the log to the mill. The mill will "process" ...
Comments

  • 2/19/2009 3:17 PM Atkins wrote:
    I’m afraid I have one foot in each house: We eat a lot of restaurant and other precooked food because the wife doesn’t want to cook half the time, and I don’t want to cook anytime. We do have a garden in the summer. We have a cat, which is less costly than a dog, but nevertheless has vet bills and cat food. No bottled water here! Although I am often capable of repairing appliances on my own – the microwave oven most recently – I still find that replacement is a better option in many cases. We don’t actually spend more than we make, but keeping that equilibrium requires plenty of attention.
    Reply to this
    1. 2/19/2009 9:26 PM DDFD wrote:
      My ex wife is clearly in one place and I am clearly in the other.

      This is not to say my wife and I don't go out to eat or order in, our well water beats bottled water any day of the week, and repairs are done in house only when we are capable of doing them.  And, yes, sometimes it doesn't pay to repair and salvage . . .

      Finally, I believe everyone should strive for quality of life, supported by smart spending decisions.  (See
      Another Look: What If We Had Less, But Better?)
      Reply to this
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